Review

tom flood

04 Dec 2007

50

This is Phil Edgeley at his introspective best. As carefully contrived as any classic, the slide weaves its elegant way through such vocal harbingers as 'Everything here stays in the ground'. Counterpointed by limpid piano and put to rest on a bed of chords from a drifting acoustic guitar, the short-breathed scan of the vocal line, like the singer has just escaped the Iron Lung, inter...

This is Phil Edgeley at his introspective best. As carefully contrived as any classic, the slide weaves its elegant way through such vocal harbingers as 'Everything here stays in the ground'. Counterpointed by limpid piano and put to rest on a bed of chords from a drifting acoustic guitar, the short-breathed scan of the vocal line, like the singer has just escaped the Iron Lung, inters the song six feet under the usual pub roots bonhomie. It might've been titled 'Dig It Up' but the dry humour that named his label Miserable Kid Recordings has this number named 'I Don't Stop'. Catch Phil Edgeley live, you'll see why.

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Review

tom flood

04 Dec 2007

40

Off Phil's 1st album, 'Try To Love' is a good example of his unusual blend of Delta blues and British music hall folk. The stop/start rhythm, the turnaround like Sgt Peppers on slide, the tough guy/innocent boy blend on vocal: this is a new kind of voice in Oz blues, a one man folk blues British invasion limping clear of the Council flats and hiphop chip butty heartland and shoul...

Off Phil's 1st album, 'Try To Love' is a good example of his unusual blend of Delta blues and British music hall folk. The stop/start rhythm, the turnaround like Sgt Peppers on slide, the tough guy/innocent boy blend on vocal: this is a new kind of voice in Oz blues, a one man folk blues British invasion limping clear of the Council flats and hiphop chip butty heartland and shouldering a space in the surfing cowboy country of the NSW Central Coast.

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Review

tom flood

04 Dec 2007

40

Doin' Me Wrong's a step-up for Phil Edgeley. This album opener's a slow fuse that laconically leads the listener into Phil's misanthropic music hall blues. The trademark slide hook cuts through drum'n'bass like a scythe, the clean blues drawl of Christian Marsh's harp promising to light a fire under the rhythm, a fire that characteristically never rages. Edgel...

Doin' Me Wrong's a step-up for Phil Edgeley. This album opener's a slow fuse that laconically leads the listener into Phil's misanthropic music hall blues. The trademark slide hook cuts through drum'n'bass like a scythe, the clean blues drawl of Christian Marsh's harp promising to light a fire under the rhythm, a fire that characteristically never rages. Edgeley's a sophisticated step outside, resisting the Chicago storm, fusing his melodic British folk roots voice with a different kind of tough, the lyrics compressed through the cold concrete of urban English street life. I'd give it a 5 for sheer bravery but the break dithers a moment before leading us firmly into a fresh sound in Australian roots.

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