Artist info

Genre

Indie, Pop, Rock


band members

Noah Harris


Website

Bio

Melbourne songwriter Harris has been at odds with his musical self for near a decade. During which, he has found himself on a journey that has been both predictable and completely erratic; a journey of unimaginable circumstances that have shaped the scope of his creative pursuits, and the trajectory of his young adult life.

Naturally, Noah Harris found a love for music at a young age in David Bowie, R.E.M., and Nirvana. Yet in the search for his musical palette, he found solace in artists like Fountains of Wayne, Bombay Bicycle Club, Elliot Smith, and even Lily Allen. To this day he acknowledges the influence that Chris Collingwood and the late Adam Schlesinger have on his songwriting: “Welcome Interstate Managers was the first record that felt like it was really mine, while everyone at school didn’t look past their big single “Stacy’s Mom”, and were quick to start listening to Eminem, I inhaled that album.”

One lonely night in Seoul in 2016, Harris received a message from one Vincent McIntyre. McIntyre, unknown to Harris at the time was starting a band with his friend Jack Wood. With a body of work well underway on their end, he was invited to try his hand at lead-singer and songwriter. Unbeknownst to him at the time, Harris and co would go on a whirlwind journey over the coming years.

The launch of their new band Fan Girl in 2016 was coupled with the release of their roaring debut single “Small Town”. In seemingly an instant, the band earned a slew of industry acclaim, with bookers, managers and record labels around the Australia cueing up to chat. The response to “Small Town” was truly an industry anomaly.

During the years that followed, Fan Girl supported Catfish and the Bottlemen, The Vines, Ecca Vandal and Birds of Tokyo all before the release of their debut album, Elephant Room in 2018. A few weeks following their hometown album launch, and the day before the band leaving for an Australian east-coast tour, their beloved Jack Wood passed away. The loss of their best mate and founding member was sudden, heartbreaking and earth-shattering. The lives of Harris, McIntyre and their Fan Girl community indefinitely went on hold.

In 2019, unsure as to whether the band would play together again, the remaining members began to resurrect what McIntyre and Wood had started. After slowly building momentum, they appeared at Bigsound that year, released two new singles and completed an east-coast tour in early 2020.

While Fan Girl was and remains Harris’ primary focus, he has continued to develop a body of work beyond the band’s mould. Although this body of work isn’t merely discarded band lyrics, it’s something personal and entirely his vision, describing it as “naturally confessional” and that it “tends to lean on the silly, heartfelt and at times dumb side.”

The project symbolises something completely intimate and honest for Harris. It also fulfils his somewhat delicate and subdued adaptation, alongside the glimmers of exuberance and force that we have come to expect from the frontman. Similarly, it’s what City and Colour is to Dallas Green; a getaway, a restraint and a momentary lapse in attention from the riff-centric and roaring attitude of a rock band.

The rollercoaster that has been Harris' young-adult life has been challenging and unpredictable. But it’s a ride that culminates in the creation of stories that are grounded in hardy and robust life experiences, enabling the subtle and justifiable artistic contributions that are uniquely his. While he may have always been a savvy songwriter with a wealth of finesse, he now more than ever wields the maturity and vision to etch his name as an artist who can go the distance.

Review

Review by Lucy Smith Lucy Smith

19 May 2020

Triple J
45

Ay, tell Sheena to drop her location. I wanna talk.

Ay, tell Sheena to drop her location. I wanna talk.

Review

Review by Richard Kingsmill Richard Kingsmill

15 May 2020

Triple J
45

Sheena doesn't know what she's missing.

Sheena doesn't know what she's missing.

Review

Review by Declan Byrne Declan Byrne

15 May 2020

Triple J
45

there's a lot of love coming in for this new song and i'm here to wholeheartedly agree that it filled my whole heart.

there's a lot of love coming in for this new song and i'm here to wholeheartedly agree that it filled my whole heart.