Artist info

Genre

Indie, Pop, Rock


band members

Noah Dillon (vocalist/guitar), Jack Hill (drums), Sam Rocchi (guitar) and Griff (bass)


Influences

Middle Kids, Julia Jacklin, Ball park music, Modest Mouse, Courtney Barnett, Car Seat Headrest , Paul Dempsey


Bio

Noah Dillon is the perfect example of an artist constantly finding inspiration from the human condition. Sensitive, intense, sweet, passionate, light hearted, joyful, effervescent – Noah’s music can be tagged with a myriad of life-affirming adjectives, but it all derives from the positive energy and inspiration that he draws from his relationships in everyday life.

“I feel like it’s something I’m pretty focused on in life and something that pops up a lot in my writing because it’s a place where there’s always a lot of passion and a lot of conflict,” says Dillon of the friendships and loves where he finds material for his music. “I’m of the opinion is all that you really leave in life is the relationships you’ve built with people and I think that relationships and analysing your relationships with people is a really good metaphor for everything in life. A breakdown in a relationship can be a metaphor for your relationship with yourself or with your mental health. I feel like it really covers a lot of ground.”

The 24-year-old rising Perth singer-songwriter’s music ranges from explosions of frenetic energy, through to hushed lullabies of soulful sensitivity. In 2020, while the world was looking inward, Noah stepped out by releasing a scorching run of singles, including the brilliant ‘Sunburnt In July,’ the intimate ‘Knievel Daredevil,’ the tongue in cheek anthem ‘Matthew McConaughey,’ and finally the foot-stomper ‘That’s Just How I Feel.’

Off the back of those songs came a tonne of media support, including resounding praise from triple j radio, providing Noah his first national platform and opportunities to play for growing audiences across the country. That success lead to him inking his first record deal with Australian indie stalwarts Dew Process, and now Noah is poised to take the next huge leap as a musician.

‘Losing Touch’ is the first single Noah releases with Dew Process, and the first single to come from his forthcoming EP – Don’t Change For The World (Like It’s Changing Me). Picking up where 2020 left off, ‘Losing Touch’ is another firecracker of power pop, swinging big melodies for the fences with an air of grandiosity and bravado.

Written in a stream of consciousness, ‘Losing Touch’ is yet another example of the kind of observation that comes from a poet first and a songwriter second, which is exactly how Dillon came to his craft. Growing up, it was creative writing and poetry that were his first loves, before a kind mentor one day took him under his wing and showed him just how easy it was to write a song.

“I went on this school camp with this guy ‘Smitto’ Smith – this camp leader. Everyone would go to camp but me and Smitto would stay up and play guitar and he taught me all these songs. I was explaining to him how I really love music and he was playing all these songs that he’d written. I got home from that and realised I could transfer all my writing and poetry into music. Once I did that it was like everything I loved came together at once – writing and music and performing. That was how it all started.”

From there Dillon soon found himself part of a growing singer-songwriter scene that was emerging out West, including fellow rising stars Fraeya and Jack Davies, alongside widely celebrated artists like Stella Donnelly and Sly Withers.

“It was me, Fraeya, and Jack (Davies), my drummer Jack Hill – we were living together and in the same year at uni (WAPA), just for one year. A contemporary songwriting diploma. The best thing was just meeting people that gave a shit about music. It really did end up being the scene that we play in now. It’s just all my friends. I love their music and we all play music together, so it’s just been like that for the last four years or so. It definitely feels like we’re in the middle of something and it’s nice to watch something grow.”

That sense of being a part of something bigger has been bolstered for Dillon throughout the years, as he’s begun to recognise a positive response to his music as he performed more and more.

“When I was like 19 or 20 I started doing a few solo shows. I’d done some with a band but when I did solo shows for the first time I noticed people actually commented on the lyrics. That was the first time I realised people were actually listening and giving a shit.”

Indeed the witty, confessional and relatable lyricism of Dillon’s heart-on-his-sleeve approach to songwriting that draws fans to his recordings. It’s when he takes those clever songs to his band for the recording of the EP – guitarist Sam Rocchi, drummer Jack Hill and former bassist Claudia Genovese – that the Noah Dillon experience becomes a whole other kind of beast. All across Don’t Change For The World (Like It’s Changing Me) you can hear their influence, all brought together by the experience they’ve gained together in the studio and more importantly on stage.

“I feel like live is where they shine,” says Dillon. “The bit that I love is showing them my vision for it and then watching them play it completely differently with their own interpretation of that.”

That closeness with his band is bolstered by Dillon’s constant sourcing of inspiration.

“I write really consistently and I write really honestly, so I think that’s where the continuity in the work comes from, because when you’re writing consistently and you’re writing really honestly it’s just like a time capsule for that time in your life.”

For Dillon to be capturing what is undoubtedly the most exciting time in his life now can only mean more exciting music to come. With Don’t Change For The World (Like It’s Changing Me) set for release later this year and an album set for 2022, it seems like the good times are only just beginning.

“It really sits in a period of time that I’d made a lot of peace with the fact that I want to be creative for the rest of my life and the fact that I need to really, really push myself to be the best songwriter I can and to push different elements in my song writing. I think you can really hear that as well.”

Review

Losing Touch

Noah Dillon

Review by Claire Mooney Claire Mooney

19 Aug 2021

Triple J
50

Those soaring high moments and unravelling energy is steeped in brilliance. I'm not sure what else to say that I haven't already. Noah Dillion continuously cements his place as WA's most exciting act in the country.

Those soaring high moments and unravelling energy is steeped in brilliance. I'm not sure what else to say that I haven't already. Noah Dillion continuously cements his place as WA's most exciting act in the country.

Review

Losing Touch

Noah Dillon

Review by Dave Ruby Howe Dave Ruby Howe

19 Aug 2021

Triple J
45

Noah plays with so much vigor and lifeblood that it makes the track shudder with rousing energy. There's no way to listen to this and not think that Noah Dillon is one of the most vital artists on the Australian indie landscape right now.

Noah plays with so much vigor and lifeblood that it makes the track shudder with rousing energy. There's no way to listen to this and not think that Noah Dillon is one of the most vital artists on the Australian indie landscape right now.

Review

Losing Touch

Noah Dillon

Review by Declan Byrne Declan Byrne

19 Aug 2021

Triple J
45

noah can write a mega hook, he can deliver heartfelt and passionate lyrics and outpourings of emotion and on this one noah proves he can also do it in a way you maybe don't expect. a kinda grandiose slice from one of the best in aus right now.

noah can write a mega hook, he can deliver heartfelt and passionate lyrics and outpourings of emotion and on this one noah proves he can also do it in a way you maybe don't expect. a kinda grandiose slice from one of the best in aus right now.