Artist info

Genre

Indie, Pop


band members

Shêm Allen - Guitars, Keys, Vocals: Andrew Sydes - Guitars, Blues Harp, Vocals :Sam Schlencker - Drums, Vocals, Vocals, Synth, Percussion, Guitar :Graham Ritchie - Bass, Percussion, Vocals, Mints


Influences

Sigur Ros, the Birthday Party, Bob Dylan


Unearthed artists we like

Hunz, Mr. Maps, Little Scout, Yeo


Bio

In twelve months of deepening obscurity, Skinny Jean begot three children: a boy, a girl, and an album. In all the resplendent wankery the band admits to represent, they have chosen a title as elongated as it is indicative. The Diving Saucer Returns from a World Where the Sun Never Shines heralds the captivating return of the four-piece. Contrasting analogue production with shiny new electronic appendages, they have slowly crafted a work that is both warm and slick. In typical Skinny Jean fashion, the album showcases songs that deeply contrast each other. After the nation-wide critical acclaim that their first album Dolce Doggerel generated, the band has sought to eclipse that full-length attempt from 2009. They spent twelve long months in exotic Moorooka at Stephen Bartlett’s Docking Station studios. Amid the bleak metropolitan setting a diverse array of songs gestated. The songs were recorded directly to tape through analogue gear and mastered to vinyl. Using this production aesthetic, the band quickly discovered the positive effect recording to tape had on their sound and performances. Showcasing here are the first 3 cuts from the Diving Saucer Returns from a World Where the Sun Never Shines which is due for release late November 2012.

Review

Reviewed by Zan Rowe Zan Rowe

04 Oct 2013

Triple J
30

There's a song here, somewhat buried in the production. Cool sounds going on, but I feel like the vocals are kept just a little too much at arms length. Still, lotta heart.

There's a song here, somewhat buried in the production. Cool sounds going on, but I feel like the vocals are kept just a little too much at arms length. Still, lotta heart.

Review

Reviewed by Nick Findlay Nick Findlay

18 Sep 2012

Triple J
40

intricate, intelligent indie, which at the same time is easy and accessible to listen to, as well as being challenging and ear-opening. Look forward to more

intricate, intelligent indie, which at the same time is easy and accessible to listen to, as well as being challenging and ear-opening. Look forward to more

Review

Reviewed by Dave Ruby Howe Dave Ruby Howe

11 Sep 2013

Triple J
30

A pretty intriguing tune from these guys. It pushes the listener back with a formless structure and a hiss. But still, I like it. You probably will too.

A pretty intriguing tune from these guys. It pushes the listener back with a formless structure and a hiss. But still, I like it. You probably will too.